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Open Journal of Neuroscience

ISSN: 2075-9088
Volume 5, 2017


Open Journal of Neuroscience, 2013, 3-4 [Mini-Review]

Brain and Spinal Cord Trauma as a Risk Factor for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Mini-Review

Elise G. Valdésa, Svitlana Garbuzova-Davisb-e*

a School of Aging Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612, United States of America
b Center of Excellence for Aging & Brain Repair, University of South Florida, Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida 33612, United States of America
c Department of Neurosurgery and Brain Repair, University of South Florida, Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida 33612, United States of America
d Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology, University of South Florida, Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida 33612, United States of America
e Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, University of South Florida, Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida 33612, United States of America

Corresponding Author & Address:

Svitlana Garbuzova-Davis*
Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair, Department of Neurosurgery and Brain Repair, University of South Florida, Morsani College of Medicine, 12901 Bruce B. Downs Blvd., Tampa, FL 33612, United States of America; Tel: 813-974-3189; Fax: 813-974-3078; Email: sgarbuzo@health.usf.edu

Article History:
Published: 12th August, 2013   Accepted: 12th August, 2013
Received: 4th June, 2013      

© Valdés and Garbuzova-Davis; licensee Ross Science Publishers

ROSS Open Access articles will be distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided that the original work will always be cited properly.

Abstract:

Trauma to the central nervous system (CNS) has been investigated as a risk factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) despite conflicting epidemiological reports. Studies have suggested a link between ALS and traumatic axonal injury which complements the “dying back” theory of ALS. The theory suggests that neuronal dysfunction first occurs at the neuromuscular junction, and subsequent axonal impairment leads to dysfunction of the cell body. A pathological link has been shown between CNS trauma and ALS, further supporting this relationship. Another proposed hypothesis is that differences in “molecular thresholds” based on individual genetic backgrounds could explain some individuals developing ALS or ALS-like pathology subsequent to trauma, as well as elucidate the seemingly increased risk for ALS associated with multiple traumas. However, it is still unclear how trauma to the CNS might directly or indirectly trigger ALS. The current mini-review re-examines the relationship between CNS trauma and risk of developing ALS or an ALS-like pathology, and explores potential explanations for discrepant study results.



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