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Open Journal of Hematology

ISSN: 2075-907X
Volume 8, 2017



Indexed in:
EMBASE

Open Journal of Hematology, 2012, 3(S1)-6 [Mini-Review]

Cell metastasis in Melanoma

Patrick A. Ott1, F. Stephen Hodi2
1 Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York University Cancer Institute, New York, NY, USA
2 Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA

Corresponding Author & Address:

Patrick A. Ott
Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York University Cancer Institute, New York, NY, USA;
Email: patrick.ott@nyumc.org
F. Stephen Hodi
Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Email: stephen_hodi@dfci.harvard.edu

Article History:
Published: 21st February, 2012   Accepted: 21st February, 2012
Received: 29th December, 2011      

© Ott et al.; licensee Ross Science Publishers

ROSS Open Access articles will be distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided that the original work will always be cited properly.

Abstract:

Cutaneous melanoma stands out as a model disease on which to study tumor progression and metastasis for several reasons. If undetected or diagnosed late, melanoma is a highly invasive tumor and almost invariably leads to metastatic spread. It tends to metastasize at a time when the tumor burden is low compared to other cancers, which is evident by the size (thickness) of the primary tumor being measured in millimeters. The fact that the majority of the almost 70,000 new melanomas diagnosed in the United States every year are detected when they are still curable, is presumably largely owed to its prominent site of origin, the skin. As a consequence, tissue from early stages of tumor development is relatively easily available for analysis, allowing for the investigation of the whole spectrum of tumor progression and the metastatic process in humans.

It is somewhat surprising that comparative genomic approaches to date have not yet consistently identified gene signatures reflecting genes or gene sets that are associated with metastasis or prognosis of melanoma. Nevertheless, tremendous progress has been made in recent years identifying mechanisms leading to metastasis in melanoma. In this review, we highlight some of the key molecules and pathways that have been discovered as drivers of metastatic progression in this disease.



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